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Also, the New York Yankees lost the pennant
John K. Tibby
December 22, 1958
Heavyweight championship went to Primo Camera (right, above) after he knocked out Boston's Jack Sharkey in the sixth. Camera, possibly one of the most put-upon fighters in history, was promised only 10% of the total receipts ($160,000). Fortnight later, pleading broke in a breach of promise suit, he said of his fight winnings: "No see that money."
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December 22, 1958

Also, The New York Yankees Lost The Pennant

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Heavyweight championship went to Primo Camera (right, above) after he knocked out Boston's Jack Sharkey in the sixth. Camera, possibly one of the most put-upon fighters in history, was promised only 10% of the total receipts ($160,000). Fortnight later, pleading broke in a breach of promise suit, he said of his fight winnings: "No see that money."

Golf's big title, the U.S. Open championship, went to Johnny Goodman of Omaha, who accepts his trophy against a backdrop of approving gyrenes. Goodman shot a 287 to beat the young Ralph Guldahl and such veterans as Craig Wood, Walter Hagen

Home run hero of the World Series was 24-year-old Mel Ott of the New York Giants. Playing in his first Series, he drove a Washington pitch into the right-field Polo Grounds stands, helped the Giants win that game 4-2 and the Series four games to one. In Ott's career, which ended in a Mississippi auto accident this fall, he hit 511 major league home runs.

Tennis battle of the Helens came to an end when Helen Wills Moody (sunshade, center) defaulted in Forest Hills finals to Helen Jacobs (right), pleading fatigue that proved to come from a displaced vertebra. Jacobs, who was leading 3-0 in third and decisive set, was to hold the title until Alice Marble's day.

Notre dame's redemption day arrived, after poor season, when the Irish beat Army 13-12 before 78,000 in Yankee Stadium. Here Army's Jack Buckler gets off a punt as Pete Kopcsak (extreme right) charges downfield to tackle Notre Dame receiver. A hero for winning Irish was Tackle Moose Krause.

Princeton's return to eastern honors and the championship of the Ivy League, after years of hard knocks, was signalized by 27-2 victory over Yale. Princeton's Frank John here kicks placement point after Tigers' first score. Unbeaten Princeton gave up only eight points all season while itself scoring 217.

Consternation day for the experts came when little Columbia upset the Goliaths of Stanford 7-0 in the Rose Bowl. Here Columbia Fullback Al Barabas (No. 28) charges around left end for 17 yards and winning touchdown without a hand being laid upon him. Play was famous double spinner known as KF79.

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