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Q&A
Tim Crothers
April 20, 1998
In Brett Tomko's first two starts this season, foes hit .204 against the Reds righty. As good as he is at painting corners, though, Tomko is at his best in front of an easel. He spent his childhood doodling cartoon characters, which developed into an interest in drawing and painting. With a degree in art communication, Tomko, 25, is the majors' resident art expert.
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April 20, 1998

Q&a

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In Brett Tomko's first two starts this season, foes hit .204 against the Reds righty. As good as he is at painting corners, though, Tomko is at his best in front of an easel. He spent his childhood doodling cartoon characters, which developed into an interest in drawing and painting. With a degree in art communication, Tomko, 25, is the majors' resident art expert.

Which famous artist would have made the best player?

I'd go with Picasso. He did so many different things, and you need someone like that—you know, a five-tool player.

Is pitching at all like painting?

Painting is a three-or four-step process; I've got to do this or that to get a certain effect. Pitching's the same. You know you want to get this guy out, and you've got to figure out how.

When do you get inspired to paint or draw?

I do it to relieve stress.

What's worth more: a picture or a thousand words?

I'm such a visual person, I'd rather look at a painting or a picture than read something. It's a little more stimulation for the brain.

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