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Should the NCAA Have Abolished the Sunday Exemption?
May 04, 1998
YESNever on Sunday was a charming movie. It should not have been an NCAA policy. The obligation to adjust all championship schedules to accommodate any school with a policy against playing on Sunday was an affront to schools with non-Christian affiliations. Further, the scheduling adjustments needlessly complicated the academic calendars of all competitors. It was about time the NCAA finally recognized a true separation of church and court.
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May 04, 1998

Should The Ncaa Have Abolished The Sunday Exemption?

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YES
Never on Sunday was a charming movie. It should not have been an NCAA policy. The obligation to adjust all championship schedules to accommodate any school with a policy against playing on Sunday was an affront to schools with non-Christian affiliations. Further, the scheduling adjustments needlessly complicated the academic calendars of all competitors. It was about time the NCAA finally recognized a true separation of church and court.

—R.O.

Or

NO

The Sunday rule showed that the NCAA could be broad-minded and that the dollar didn't dictate every decision in college sports. In this area, at least, schools still saw a bigger picture. The NCAA could have adjusted the rule—and embraced all faiths—by changing the word Sunday to Sabbath. Everyone from Brigham Young to Yeshiva would have been covered. Instead, the NCAA left one more impression that what it really worships is Mammon.

—Ivan Maisel

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