SI Vault
 
Blotter
March 05, 2001
Died?Australian cricket legend Sir Donald Bradman, 92. The greatest batsman in the sport's history, he dominated for two decades, from 1928 to '48. Fellow cricketer and renowned writer R.C, Robertson-Glasgow said of Bradman in 1949, "He was, as near as a batting man may be, the flawless engine. Poetry and murder lived in him together. He would slice the bowling to ribbons, then dance without pity on the corpse." Last year an Aussie edition of SI dubbed Bradman "not just the most revered Australian sportsman, but the most revered Australian, period."
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March 05, 2001

Blotter

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Died
?Australian cricket legend Sir Donald Bradman, 92. The greatest batsman in the sport's history, he dominated for two decades, from 1928 to '48. Fellow cricketer and renowned writer R.C, Robertson-Glasgow said of Bradman in 1949, "He was, as near as a batting man may be, the flawless engine. Poetry and murder lived in him together. He would slice the bowling to ribbons, then dance without pity on the corpse." Last year an Aussie edition of SI dubbed Bradman "not just the most revered Australian sportsman, but the most revered Australian, period."

Pulled Out
? Honda, from advertising on XFL broadcasts. Said Gerry Rubin, CEO of the company's ad agency, "The programming is not consistent with what was promised." He also noted that there were few import cars in parking lots at games.

Released
?By Rounder Records, Joe Louis: An American Hero, a CD containing 15 musical tributes from the 1930s and '40s to the heavyweight great, by artists such as Count Basie and Cab Calloway.

Scrapped
?By the USOC, exemptions for baseball, basketball and hockey players from its drug testing policy. Unlike most other potential Olympic athletes, Americans in those sports are tested for performance-enhancing drugs only after they are selected to the Olympic team. Now those who wish to compete, including NBA and NHL players, will have to give their names to the USOC 12 months before the Games and submit to random tests.

Aced
?The par-312th hole at Wentworth Country Club in Tarpon Springs, Fla., by Yankees coach Don Zimmer, who tossed his ball in the water afterward. Said Yanks manager Joe Torre, "He was celebrating, I guess—unless he wanted to put it where his other balls were."

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