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Farewell
December 29, 2003
Althea Gibson 76Was there ever a better female athlete than Gibson, who went to college on a basketball scholarship, became a tennis champion (infusing power into the women's game) and played on the LPGA tour? Her legacy is as the figure who, with dignity and decorum, broke tennis's color lines and won Wimbledon in '57.
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December 29, 2003

Farewell

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Althea Gibson
76
Was there ever a better female athlete than Gibson, who went to college on a basketball scholarship, became a tennis champion (infusing power into the women's game) and played on the LPGA tour? Her legacy is as the figure who, with dignity and decorum, broke tennis's color lines and won Wimbledon in '57.

Bobby Bonds
57
Dazzlingly athletic during his 14-year career, he bequeathed his power (332 home runs) and speed (461 stolen bases) to his record-shattering son. Barry Bonds hit two 10th-inning homers the week his father died and said afterward, "I just lost my coach."

Bill Shoemaker
72
Tiny (4'11", 95 pounds) and unflappable (he sat still as a statue in the saddle), he won four Kentucky Derbys, the last in '86 on an 18-1 shot at age 54. Shoe won about 22% of his starts—8,833 races (second alltime)—and no jockey used the reins more skillfully.

Diane Geppi Aikens
40
She coached Loyola's women's lacrosse team to eight NCAA tournaments since '94, all the while battling brain cancer. From her wheelchair last spring she inspired the Greyhounds to the semifinals. Said associate coach Kerri Johnson, "She was Superwoman."

George Plimpton
76
No one wrote more intelligently, or eloquently, about sports than the groundbreaking journalist who took a turn as the Lions' quarterback, boxed Archie Moore and gave birth to Sidd Finch.

Sid Gillman
91
He pioneered wide-open offenses with the AFL's Chargers in the '60s, believing in the deep strike and the short one. The father of modern passing coached for 40 years.

Valery Brumel
60
The 6'1" Russian raised the high jump mark to 7'5�", won gold in '64 and was the world's best when a motorcycle crash derailed him in '65. He could kick a basketball rim.

Dave DeBusschere
62
As much as any championship team, the Knicks of 1970 and '73 played selflessly and relentlessly; DeBusschere—scorer, rebounder, defender—was their heart and soul.

Larry Doby
79
As the second black major leaguer, and the first in the AL, he endured as much prejudice as Jackie Robinson. He was also one of the game's best sluggers, a seven-time All-Star.

Keith Magnuson
56
The Blackhawks' fearless enforcer took karate and boxing lessons to hone his skills and helped Chicago claw into the 71 finals. He played 11 years, then coached for two more.

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