SI Vault
 
HIGHLIGHT
Herman Weiskopf
May 08, 1967
Steve Barber of the Orioles (right) wearily surveyed the scene before him in last Sunday's game against the Tigers. He had a no-hit, no-run game going, with two outs in the ninth. The score was 1-0. There were runners on second and third as the result of walks (Barber's eighth and ninth of the game) and a sacrifice. Barber worked the count on Mickey Stanley to 1 and 2, putting him within one strike of the no-hitter. Then he threw a changeup. The pitch skittered into the dirt, the runner on third came in to tie the score and the runner on second moved to third. Laboring badly, Barber walked Stanley, and Manager Hank Bauer went to the mound. Almost solemnly he told the pitcher, "I'm sorry I can't go with you any longer. I tried to stick with you, but you ran out of gas." Replied Barber, "I knew it three innings ago." Reliever Stu Miller came in to face Don Wert, who hit a grounder beyond second base. Shortstop Luis Aparicio made a tine stop, but Second Baseman Mark Belanger dropped his throw and the Tigers went ahead 2-1. With the horse stolen, Miller finally got the third out and locked up the no-hitter. But the Orioles failed to score in the bottom of the ninth and thus suffered the ignominy of losing a game in which their opponents had not gotten a hit. It was the first time two pitchers ever collaborated on a no-hitter (though in 1956 three Cincinnati Reds combined for nine hitless innings before giving up a double in the 10th and three more hits and the game in the 11th). Barber, who two Sundays earlier missed a no-hitter against the Angels with one out in the ninth, laughs at bad luck by wearing No. 13 and saying, "I'm a left-hander, and I guess that explains a lot."
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 08, 1967

Highlight

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

Steve Barber of the Orioles (right) wearily surveyed the scene before him in last Sunday's game against the Tigers. He had a no-hit, no-run game going, with two outs in the ninth. The score was 1-0. There were runners on second and third as the result of walks (Barber's eighth and ninth of the game) and a sacrifice. Barber worked the count on Mickey Stanley to 1 and 2, putting him within one strike of the no-hitter. Then he threw a changeup. The pitch skittered into the dirt, the runner on third came in to tie the score and the runner on second moved to third. Laboring badly, Barber walked Stanley, and Manager Hank Bauer went to the mound. Almost solemnly he told the pitcher, "I'm sorry I can't go with you any longer. I tried to stick with you, but you ran out of gas." Replied Barber, "I knew it three innings ago." Reliever Stu Miller came in to face Don Wert, who hit a grounder beyond second base. Shortstop Luis Aparicio made a tine stop, but Second Baseman Mark Belanger dropped his throw and the Tigers went ahead 2-1. With the horse stolen, Miller finally got the third out and locked up the no-hitter. But the Orioles failed to score in the bottom of the ninth and thus suffered the ignominy of losing a game in which their opponents had not gotten a hit. It was the first time two pitchers ever collaborated on a no-hitter (though in 1956 three Cincinnati Reds combined for nine hitless innings before giving up a double in the 10th and three more hits and the game in the 11th). Barber, who two Sundays earlier missed a no-hitter against the Angels with one out in the ninth, laughs at bad luck by wearing No. 13 and saying, "I'm a left-hander, and I guess that explains a lot."

1