SI Vault
 
19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
May 08, 1967
CAMPGROUNDSSirs:I'm glad your "transom" was big enough to accommodate Gerard W. O'Connor. His essay, Yes, Darling, but Who Was on Third? (April 24), evoked pangs of delight, nostalgia—and frustration. Who did tackle Phil Colella?RICHARD A. RANCATOREWoburn, Mass.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
May 08, 1967

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

CAMPGROUNDS
Sirs:
I'm glad your "transom" was big enough to accommodate Gerard W. O'Connor. His essay, Yes, Darling, but Who Was on Third? (April 24), evoked pangs of delight, nostalgia—and frustration. Who did tackle Phil Colella?
RICHARD A. RANCATORE
Woburn, Mass.

?Skippy Minisi.—ED.

Sirs:
Gerard O'Connor is apparently a camp dilettante, one who possesses a sound knowledge of many sports but cannot settle on any one in particular. Although baseball crops up most often in his article he has exhibited a terrible lack of discrimination in his choices. For example, anybody who knows baseball and is familiar with camp can tell you about Harry Steinfeldt. A real camp baseball fan would be able to recall how many double plays Tinker, Evers and Chance completed during their best year. (It was only one-fourth of the total turned in by any decent double-play combination nowadays.) He would also be able to discourse on the lack of rapport between Evers and Chance, and remark on Tinker's fantastic hitting ability against Christy Mathewson. Any camp fan would know that Clarence Mitchell, a Dodger pitcher, was the victim of Wambsganss' triple play, but the fascinating feature of this incident (from a camp point of view) was that Mitchell hit into a double play on his next trip to the plate, thus accounting for five outs in two at bats.

For some camp questions to separate the men from the boys, consider these two:

1) In the seventh inning of the seventh game of the 1952 World Series, Billy Martin of the Yankees made a last-second catch of an infield pop-up hit by Jackie Robinson to erase the final Dodger threat of the Series. Everyone remembers Martin and Robinson, but who was the pitcher who made it possible? Here's a clue. It was his only appearance of the Series, but that wasn't surprising because he had done the same thing the year before against the Giants when he made his only appearance in the ninth inning of the sixth and final game and retired Sal Yvars for the last out when Hank Bauer made a sitting catch in right field.

2) In the 1948 Series Bob Feller faced Johnny Sain in the opener. Everyone remembers that Feller and Boudreau picked a Brave cleanly off second (as pictures in papers around the country showed the next day), only to have the umpire call him safe. The runner scored shortly after for the only run of the game and Feller never came that close to winning a World Series game again. Who was the base runner?

Anybody who can answer these two questions deserves to be called a camp expert.
SEAN SLOANE
Westport, Conn.

?Answers for noncampers: Bob Kuzava pitched to Jackie Robinson in the 1952 Series. Phil Masi, running for Catcher Bill Salkeld, scored the winning run in the 1948 opener.—ED.

Sirs:
Yes, everybody does know who Billy Wambsganss is. Lots of people know it was Clarence Mitchell on the other end of that liner, and I bet quite a few even know that his teammates on base were Miller and Kilduff. What is camp is knowing that Wambsganss led the American League that year in most errors by a second baseman!
PETER A. BERKOWSKY
Ithaca, N.Y.

Sirs:
Would it be pure Camp to know who the quarterback was on the first All-America?
THOMAS DUNNE
Toronto

Continue Story
1 2 3