SI Vault
 
The Man Who Changed Hockey
MICHAEL FARBER
January 30, 2006
In the dead of the NHL lockout Red Wing Brendan Shanahan singlehandedly brought together some of the sport's key figures for an improbable summit that rewrote the rule book and revived the game. And at 37, he looks better too
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
January 30, 2006

The Man Who Changed Hockey

In the dead of the NHL lockout Red Wing Brendan Shanahan singlehandedly brought together some of the sport's key figures for an improbable summit that rewrote the rule book and revived the game. And at 37, he looks better too

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2

In the end, of course, this was postsummit hockey: three 5-on-3 power plays-- Detroit defenseman Chris Chelios avowed afterward that NBC was leaning on refs to "control the game," to create scoring opportunities and keep the score close--and a late Red Wings penalty that was an indirect result of the new rule that curtails goalie puckhandling. With the puck slowly rimming the boards and an Avalanche forward giving chase, Legace had to remain in net, forbidden from going out to play the puck. That forced the scrambling Detroit defense to take a holding penalty with fewer than four minutes left.

But buoyed by the superb center Pavel Datsyuk, who had scored in the first minute on a Shanahan feed--"Shanny's there to keep the flies off Datsyuk," Babcock says--and attentive defense in the third period, Detroit held on for a 4-3 win, moving five points clear of the Nashville Predators, their closest pursuers in the West. Like Shanahan, the Wings were at the summit.

SI.COM

For more NHL coverage, and more from Michael Farber, go to SI.com/hockey.

1 2