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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
December 23, 1985
BEAN'SSir:Three cheers for John Skow's very informative article on L.L. Bean (Using The Old Bean, Dec. 2). I'm only 15, yet I love Bean's as if it were my best friend. Whenever I am in need of clothes, I first head to the Bean catalog. L.L. Bean is the most reliable mail-order corporation and should receive praise. So should Skow for his wonderful story.KIRSTEN NIXA Simsbury, Conn.
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December 23, 1985

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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BEAN'S
Sir:
Three cheers for John Skow's very informative article on L.L. Bean (Using The Old Bean, Dec. 2). I'm only 15, yet I love Bean's as if it were my best friend. Whenever I am in need of clothes, I first head to the Bean catalog. L.L. Bean is the most reliable mail-order corporation and should receive praise. So should Skow for his wonderful story.
KIRSTEN NIXA
Simsbury, Conn.

Sir:
Thank you for a great article on L.L. Bean. Being a resident of a town about 30 miles north of Freeport, I often visit Bean's. In fact, for as long as I can remember, my family and I have visited Bean's on Christmas at about 1:00 a.m. It's kind of like a tradition. So I can relate to the magic that John Skow spoke of.
TREVOR RALPH
Waldoboro, Maine

LINSEMAN AND COACH
Sir:
I especially enjoyed Bob Kravitz's article on Ken Linseman (The Rat That Roared, Scored And Prospered, Nov. 25). Along with the story, you show four game or locker-room shots of Linseman, one as an Oiler, one as a Flyer and two as a Bruin. I noticed that Bruin coach Butch Goring is in the lower picture on page 47. Could that also be Goring wearing No. 21 as an Islander on page 53?
MARK R. DOHERTY
Ottawa

Sir:
Is that Butch Goring wearing the No. 21 jersey? I thought he wore No. 91 when he played for the Isles.
STEVE M. ANDERSEN
Eagan, Minn.

?Yes, it is Goring. Before he got No. 91, he wore No. 21 briefly after he was traded to the Islanders from Los Angeles, where he wore No. 19.—ED.

STREET SCENE (CONT.)
Sir:
Earlier this year you published several items concerning the naming of streets after Pete Rose and other noted sports figures (SCORECARD, Sept. 30, 19TH HOLE, Oct. 7 et seq.). I would like to add that in anticipation of Rose's 4,192nd hit, the city of Covington, Ky. (situated right across the Ohio River from the Reds' Riverfront Stadium) named a road being built to a new waterfront restaurant Pete Rose Drive. Rose's accomplishments have helped our city, too.
IRVIN T. (BUTCH) CALLERY
Mayor, Pro Tern
Covington, Ky.

Sir:
I'm sure your list was not designed to be all-inclusive, but, as a Minnesota sports fan, I noticed a glaring omission. Metropolitan Stadium is now gone, but countless memories of our beloved Twins live on in a street located at the south end of the old stadium site—(Harmon) Killebrew Drive. The Twins hit baseballs indoors now, but not with quite the same "drive" with which Killebrew hit them!
DOUG HAGGE
Bloomington, Minn.

Sir:
You forgot Triandos Drive in Timonium, Md., named after Gus Triandos, who was the first to use the oversize catcher's mitt designed by Paul Richards to handle Hoyt Wilhelm's knucklers.
SHERLEY EWING
Baltimore

Sir:
Let me add another street named after a boxer: Cincinnati's Ezzard Charles Drive.
GEORGE CLEVELAND
Sharon, Mass.

Sir:
One more: Shug Jordan Parkway in Auburn, Ala. And speaking of great, immortal and much-loved coaches, I hope Grambling's Eddie Robinson gets a real pretty street.
SUSAN ENKEBOLL
Houston

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