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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER
Edited by Gay Flood
May 10, 1982
THE 49ERS' NEHEMIAH Sir:Wonderful! First, my all-star but ill-fated Rams finish below par in 1981 and the dreaded 49ers go on to win Super Bowl XVI. Now, San Francisco gets Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah, a world-record-setting hurdler, to help its cause ("...But Can He Take a Hit?" April 26). I can well imagine NFL defenders attempting to cover him on his lightning-quick pass routes. If Nehemiah gets behind the defense, it will be 88 and out the gate!
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May 10, 1982

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

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THE 49ERS' NEHEMIAH
Sir:
Wonderful! First, my all-star but ill-fated Rams finish below par in 1981 and the dreaded 49ers go on to win Super Bowl XVI. Now, San Francisco gets Renaldo (Skeets) Nehemiah, a world-record-setting hurdler, to help its cause ("...But Can He Take a Hit?" April 26). I can well imagine NFL defenders attempting to cover him on his lightning-quick pass routes. If Nehemiah gets behind the defense, it will be 88 and out the gate!

I have spent many hours watching in awe as Nehemiah breezed to victories in the hurdles at the University of Maryland. If he does only half as well in pro football, I have but two words for the " Anaheim" Rams and the rest of the league: Good luck!
THOMAS GILLEN
Alexandria, Va.

Sir:
As a track fan, I thoroughly enjoyed your article on Renaldo Nehemiah's switch to pro football. But one thing bothers me: Why do the experts seem to think he can't take a hit? It can't be because they feel he's not up to it physically; we're talking about a world-class sprinter with the strength of a tight end and the flexibility of a gymnast. Aren't strength and flexibility among the primary traits a player needs to reduce the risk of injury? Maybe the pros are worried about his mental toughness. But again, we're talking about a man who was at the top of his field for four years. The training he endured and the competition he engaged in were of an intensity that few athletes ever experience. He's as mentally tough as they come.
LEE V.WILLIAMS III
Dallas

Sir:
One is tempted to admire Renaldo Nehemiah for his disdain of false modesty. One is also tempted to wonder how long it will take him to learn true humility from the secondaries of those teams whose administrators he characterizes as buffoons. My bet is that he becomes modest before he becomes the world's greatest wide receiver.
R.J. BOXWELL JR.
San Leandro, Calif.

PATRIOTS: NEW AND OLD
Sir:
Thank you for Jack McCallum's fine article on Kenneth Sims (It's Sims, or So It Seems, April 26). As a Texas fan, I have made the trip from Houston to Austin many times, I have seen some of the greats walk out on the field at Memorial Stadium and have watched Sims as a starter for two years. My only regret is that Houston didn't have the first pick in the NFL draft instead of New England.
JEFF WALLIS
Houston

Sir:
Like all athletes, I enjoy seeing my name in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. However, I didn't appreciate the context in which my name was used in Jack McCallum's article on Ken Sims and the New England Patriots. McCallum's remark about my being "too small" indicates that he has very limited knowledge of what it takes to be an athlete. If I were too small, I'm sure I wouldn't have lasted the past nine years with the Patriots. Before the 1981 season, I had started 110 consecutive games and played in 117 out of 118 games. Are these the statistics of a person who is too small? If so, all athletes should be too small.

As far as being finished at nose tackle, please don't retire me prematurely. When I'm finished, I will be the first person to say so.
RAY HAMILTON
Sharon, Mass.

CONSIDERING A STRIKE
Sir:
Having only one year's experience in the NFL, as an offensive guard for the Green Bay Packers, I haven't yet been exposed to all the treacheries and indignities we players are supposed to be suffering at the hands of the owners. Therefore, I feel that it's up to Ed Garvey and my fellow players to convince me that I should put my young career on the line by participating in a strike. Besides having to consider the vague plan of attack proposed by Garvey and the Players' Executive Committee, those of us who are still wrestling with the issues must now ponder the flippant remark about "the apathetic 1,000 who didn't come to the convention" made by Gary Fencik in your April 5 SCORECARD. His comment shows a lack of sensitivity to those of us who couldn't attend the players' convention in New Mexico because of a lack of funds or previous business or family commitments.

Instead of exhibiting contempt for the absent members, Fencik should have been more tolerant and flexible. After all, if we don't receive such civilities within our own ranks, how can we expect the same from the owners, which is what we want in the first place?
TIMOTHY HUFFMAN
Dallas

ARGUELLO
Sir:
Considering that boxing is a sport in which the biggest names—not necessarily the best fighters—receive most of the media coverage, Clive Gammon's article on Alexis Arguello (Home Is Where the Heart Is, April 26) is perceptive in revealing what many observers have overlooked: Arguello is today's best boxer. Moreover, Arguello's place in history as an alltime great hasn't been won in the ring alone. As described in the article, his conduct—as a sportsman and as a man—has won him the respect of millions. His contribution to boxing is important, because he brings professionalism and dignity to a sport badly in need of both.
MATT REUBEN
Decatur, Ill.

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