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Alive And Kicking
Nicholas Dawidoff
September 30, 1991
Presumed dead in August, the Red Sox are back in their division's race
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September 30, 1991

Alive And Kicking

Presumed dead in August, the Red Sox are back in their division's race

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They should be, for there is an inexorable quality to this Boston team. "When you're going good, it sometimes doesn't matter who's in the lineup," says Morgan, whose Red Sox have gained steadily on the Jays despite injuries to centerfielder Ellis Burks and leftfielder Mike Green-well. No matter. Steve (Psycho) Lyons, dropped by the Chicago White Sox in April, has found center a suitable stage, and Plantier has played so smoothly in left that Greenwell, an accomplished hitter who's a vaudevillian afield and a lout in the clubhouse, has prompted mention of Wally Pipp.

A most formidable Bostonian of late has been Clark. Jack Volume, as his teammates call him, likes his music loud and his hits long. Although at week's end his average was still languishing at .233, now that he's meeting expectations in other categories (25 home runs and 81 RBIs), Clark sounds positively sanguine. "It's gratifying seeing everybody grow, sticking together, jelling," he said after smacking a 400-foot opposite-field homer in Saturday's win. "It's something you'll remember for the rest of your life."

Across the clubhouse, Reardon, a Dalton, Mass., native, lends perspective to this latest attempt by the Red Sox to win a World Series, something they haven't done in 73 years. "The guys here want it more than they would if they played for another team," he says. "They want to win, probably as much as the fans do."

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