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July 05, 2010
I am saving the June 14 issue and nicknaming it the Sportsmanship Issue, since it was full of people who understood the purpose and value of sports. Reading articles about Ken Griffey Jr., John Wooden and Armando Galarraga just made me feel good about the sports world.
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July 05, 2010

Letters

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I am saving the June 14 issue and nicknaming it the Sportsmanship Issue, since it was full of people who understood the purpose and value of sports. Reading articles about Ken Griffey Jr., John Wooden and Armando Galarraga just made me feel good about the sports world.

Kerry Walsh, Clinton, Ind.

Thank you for your celebration of the life of John Wooden (Remembering the Wizard, June 14). More than a basketball coach—actually a teacher of life—Wooden was renowned for his dedication to conveying a message of faith and responsibility to young people. Even after his death he will continue to be someone for people, young or old, to admire regardless of their endeavors.

Raymond P. Bailey, Ottawa, Ill.

John Wooden's life reminds us that in this cynical, dog-eat-dog world there are principles that are universal and timeless. It didn't matter whether he was coaching an NCAA title game or teaching English at an Indiana high school, his message was always the same: Follow your moral compass wherever you go and whatever you do.

Jerry Schwartz, Alpharetta, Ga.

As dean of students at Brattleboro Union High, I often found myself counseling struggling students with John Wooden quotes. My favorite: "Discipline yourself, and others won't need to."

Jerry Gagliardi, Brattleboro, Vt.

Life Lesson

Tom Verducci's article about the call that denied Armando Galarraga a perfect game beautifully presented both sides of the story (A Different Kind of Perfect, June 14). I was impressed not only by Galarraga's gracious behavior and umpire Jim Joyce's admission of fault, but also by the effort Tigers manager Jim Leyland made to comfort Joyce after he learned how upset the umpire was. Galarraga may not make the history books for a perfect game, but I hope that his and Joyce's behavior will be remembered for generations to come.

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