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October 11, 2010
The subject addressed in Worlds Collide (Sept. 20) by Tim Layden is very timely: quiet versus loud in the NFL. Loud seems to be celebrated more today than ever, but you should have to do something first before you can talk. Save the loud talk for the victory parade—not the preseason.
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October 11, 2010

Letters

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The subject addressed in Worlds Collide (Sept. 20) by Tim Layden is very timely: quiet versus loud in the NFL. Loud seems to be celebrated more today than ever, but you should have to do something first before you can talk. Save the loud talk for the victory parade—not the preseason.

Ron Bouchard, Ogdensburg, N.Y.

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Layden wrote that Randy Moss's postgame rant was the exception on a Patriots team not known for bragging. So why are the Bengals considered brash just because of Ochocinco and T.O.? Why is it that one person is an exception but two people constitute the rule for an entire team?

Brian Engler, Brighton, Mass.

Controversial Catch

I strongly disagree with Jim Trotter's comments about the controversy surrounding Lions receiver Calvin Johnson's noncatch against the Bears (INSIDE THE NFL, Sept. 20). A catch is called a completion for a reason, and the rule about maintaining control is clear and sensible. Changing it—as Trotter suggests the competition committee should—would only add controversy, because refs would be required to judge how much possession is enough.

J. Stuart Showalter, Atlanta

Instead of arguing about the letter versus the spirit of the rule regarding the definition of a completed pass, we should focus on the distinction between celebrating and hotdogging. To remove any doubt, Johnson should have done what kids are taught to do in Pee Wee football: simply hand the ball to the referee.

Jeff Baka

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