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THE CASE AGAINST LANCE ARMSTRONG
Selena Roberts
January 24, 2011
AS THE CYCLIST AND CANCER CRUSADER FACES POSSIBLE INDICTMENT BY A GRAND JURY, SI TAKES A CLOSE LOOK AT OLD AND NEW ALLEGATIONS THAT HE USED PERFORMANCE-ENHANCING DRUGS WHILE WINNING TOUR DE FRANCE CHAMPIONSHIPS
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January 24, 2011

The Case Against Lance Armstrong

AS THE CYCLIST AND CANCER CRUSADER FACES POSSIBLE INDICTMENT BY A GRAND JURY, SI TAKES A CLOSE LOOK AT OLD AND NEW ALLEGATIONS THAT HE USED PERFORMANCE-ENHANCING DRUGS WHILE WINNING TOUR DE FRANCE CHAMPIONSHIPS

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When asked if the incident in St. Moritz described by Landis happened, Armstrong's lawyer said, "No."

Novitzky's investigations of the use of performance-enhancing drugs date back to baseball's so-called steroids era, during which the federal agent led the BALCO inquiry that resulted in the prosecution and conviction of former Olympic gold medalist Marion Jones for lying about her use of PEDs, and the upcoming trial of retired baseball star Barry Bonds on perjury charges. Armstrong is determined to keep his legacy from crumbling under Novitzky's investigation, but there have been times when he has seemed to treat his adversary as if he were an inferior cyclist in a road race rather than a formidable investigator.

Just after the raid on Popovych's house, and following a meeting Novitzky had in Lyon, France, with Interpol, Armstrong unleashed his cheeky Twitter alter ego, Juan Pelota (a pun on the English word one and the Spanish word for ball, in reference to Armstrong's testicular cancer surgery). Pelota tweeted: Hey Jeff, como estan los hoteles de quatro estrellas y el classe de business in el aeroplano? Que mas necesitan? Translated, the mangled Spanish tweaks Novitzky by asking, "How are the four-star hotels and business class in the airplane? What more do you need?"

That is a question for the grand jury.

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