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June 06, 2011
In your story, Washington assistant Raphael Chillious cautions recruits about coaches who cheat and asks, "Want to play for someone who lies?" I found that interesting, considering that in 2003 the NCAA punished Huskies coach Lorenzo Romar's program for myriad major recruiting violations involving four prospective student athletes.
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June 06, 2011

Letters

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In your story, Washington assistant Raphael Chillious cautions recruits about coaches who cheat and asks, "Want to play for someone who lies?" I found that interesting, considering that in 2003 the NCAA punished Huskies coach Lorenzo Romar's program for myriad major recruiting violations involving four prospective student athletes.

Tim Harrington, Everett, Wash.

Bruce Schoenfeld's article (The Spectacular Life of a College Basketball Recruiter, May 16) should be Exhibit A for the NCAA's Committee on Infractions. Each time Chillious or the other assistant coaches shared their assessment of a potential student-athlete with Schoenfeld, they violated NCAA Rule 13.10.2.1, which states, in part, "athletics department staff members shall not evaluate or rate a prospective student-athlete for news media ... prior to the prospective student-athlete's signed acceptance of the institution's written offer of admission."

Chris Williams Germantown, Tenn.

Don Catlin Responds

While I can't claim to know all the facts contained in the story (The Case Against Lance Armstrong, by Selena Roberts and David Epstein, Jan. 24), I do know that in March 2000 the U.S. Olympic Committee and I were grappling with how to raise the testosterone testing standard within the international legal framework and make the test more stringent for U.S. athletes, not less so, as stated by the reporters. I have made these meeting notes public. Also, I want to point out that I never knew which athlete might have tested high for a banned substance, as the UCLA Olympic Lab under my direction always used numbers not names to identify samples.

As a sports research and testing scientist for nearly three decades, I have dedicated my life to ridding sport of performance-enhancing drugs. Those who have worked closely with me know how committed I am to the integrity of sport and its pillars: an effective drug-testing process, research to keep up with new and evolving drugs, and the active support of athletes.

Don H. Catlin, M.D.

President, Anti-Doping Research and Support Clean Sport

Los Angeles

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