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June 27, 2011
Oh, the irony of NCAA football. In addition to revenue earned from football camps and speaking engagements, coaches like Jim Tressel can command a salary of $3.5 million per year. But the student-athletes, the ones who actually play the games, are prohibited from trading in their used, worn-out jerseys and team memorabilia for a little spending money.
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June 27, 2011

Letters

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Oh, the irony of NCAA football. In addition to revenue earned from football camps and speaking engagements, coaches like Jim Tressel can command a salary of $3.5 million per year. But the student-athletes, the ones who actually play the games, are prohibited from trading in their used, worn-out jerseys and team memorabilia for a little spending money.

William Vining, Laurens, N.Y.

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I want to thank George Dohrmann and David Epstein for their outstanding investigative piece on Tressel and the corruption at Ohio State (The Fall of Jim Tressel, June 6). From the multitude of student-athletes with criminal records, to the dishonest coaches and agents, to the scandals with the bowl system, one can only wonder what will be left of college football when all of the corrupt layers have been peeled away.

Brenden R. West

Dubuque, Iowa

Coach Tressel was lauded throughout his career for his morals and public displays of rectitude. How sad is it that he now will be seen as an example of what not to be: a man who plays by the rules in public but fails to do the right thing when no one is watching.

Joseph Hayes

The Woodlands, Texas

As an OSU alumnus, it saddens me to think that Tressel violated the rules under the auspices of doing whatever it takes to win. Still, I don't put the blame on Tressel alone. Where were athletic director Gene Smith and university president Gordon Gee during all of this?.

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