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September 12, 2011
Anyone who attends a Navy game and does not shed a tear while watching the Midshipmen face the crowd and sing Navy Blue and Gold with their hands on their hearts does not have a soul. I believe this tradition is one of the most poignant moments in all of college sports.
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September 12, 2011

Letters

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Anyone who attends a Navy game and does not shed a tear while watching the Midshipmen face the crowd and sing Navy Blue and Gold with their hands on their hearts does not have a soul. I believe this tradition is one of the most poignant moments in all of college sports.

Bob Lastowski, Holyoke, Mass.

SI praises the game-day tradition at Florida State (Bringing Out the Best, Aug. 22) in which Seminoles mascot Chief Osceola, who's dressed in tribal costume, throws a flaming spear into the ground at midfield. Yet Illinois mascot Chief Illiniwek, who was dressed in native Sioux regalia and danced at halftime, was banned by the NCAA for being "hostile and abusive"to American Indian culture. How is that fair?

Jeff Koebel, Lake Zurich, Ill.

Don't you find it odd that your top-ranked tradition, the Ohio State University Marching Band's formation of Script Ohio, was actually first performed by the band from archrival Michigan during a game in Columbus in 1932, four years before the Buckeyes began doing it?

Brian Resutek, Atlanta

Heisman Predictor

One look at your Heisman predictor (Heisman Formula, Aug. 22) and it's obvious that the best chance of being considered for the award is to play for a team with red uniforms. Nine of the top 15 candidates mentioned are wearing red.

Robert D. Phipps Idaho Falls, Idaho

Making the Grade?

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