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THE MAIL
February 27, 2012
The bravery it takes to be a great owner is either celebrated or reviled. I envy the Patriots' great ownership, because Robert Kraft hired all the right people, took risks and allowed those under him to make the appropriate decisions that helped set the mold for a successful franchise.
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February 27, 2012

The Mail

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The bravery it takes to be a great owner is either celebrated or reviled. I envy the Patriots' great ownership, because Robert Kraft hired all the right people, took risks and allowed those under him to make the appropriate decisions that helped set the mold for a successful franchise.

Eric Lefton, Evanston, Ill.

While reading your story on Kraft (Kraftwork, Feb. 6) I was stunned to see the subhead that referred to the Patriots as "the NFL's model franchise." A model? Really? Are these the same Patriots who were caught cheating their way to victories via Spygate? It's funny, because since Spygate was exposed, they've lost twice in the Super Bowl.

Chris Luther, Stafford, Va.

Not Much Change

After reading your article on the early days of pro football (The First Super Bowl, Feb. 6), I couldn't help but marvel at how so much has remained the same in the culture of the sport, even after more than 100 years. Home field advantage is still a significant factor in determining wins and losses. Violence is still simultaneously desired and decried. Players continue to follow the money. And the media still maintains their role as dramatist.

Richard Butler, Evans City, Pa.

Fair Play

I strongly disagree with Joe Sheehan's assertion that the National League should adopt the designated hitter rule (INSIDE MLB, Feb. 6). The DH undermines the beauty and integrity of baseball, because it encourages the development of incomplete baseball players. Pitchers will never hit as well as position players due to the demands of the mound, but to excuse them from at least trying to contribute on offense only cheapens the game.

Allen Salter, Evanston, Ill.

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