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THE MAIL
May 28, 2012
Title IX didn't just change the sports landscape for women, it changed it for men as well. When I was in high school, boys and girls participated in sports based on gender. Boys played basketball and football and wrestled, while girls fenced or played tennis and golf. After Title IX, gym classes became coed and boys got to participate in sports that had previously been reserved for girls.
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May 28, 2012

The Mail

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Title IX didn't just change the sports landscape for women, it changed it for men as well. When I was in high school, boys and girls participated in sports based on gender. Boys played basketball and football and wrestled, while girls fenced or played tennis and golf. After Title IX, gym classes became coed and boys got to participate in sports that had previously been reserved for girls.

Kent Frederick, Downers Grove, Ill.

The Power of IX

I loved your package on Title IX (The Power of Play). My wife, Becky Collins, was featured in SI's FACES IN THE CROWD on April 20, 1959—she also appeared on the July 13 cover that year—and held four world records in the butterfly and one in the medley relay during her career. Although she worked out briefly with the Indiana swim team, there were no athletic scholarships available for women back then. She retired in 1961, at 17. I can't help but wonder how different things might have been for her if Title IX had been in effect.

Steve Furste, Zionsville, Ind.

As the father of a daughter who has benefited from Title IX, I applaud the legislation. However, as a former collegiate wrestler who has witnessed so many NCAA men's programs being dropped in order to comply with Title IX, I can't help but cry foul. Far too many male wrestlers, gymnasts, swimmers and volleyball players have had their opportunities at the college level cut short under the guise of equality.

Jeff Rufolo, Signal Mountain, Tenn.

Half Throttle

So the stars of NASCAR are sandbagging the first 26 races of the season in order to save themselves for the Chase (INSIDE NASCAR)? What a crock. How should that make the fans who pay to see these guys in those races feel? No wonder attendance and interest in NASCAR have continued to dwindle.

Joe Miegoc, Carbondale, Pa.

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