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THE MAIL
August 20, 2012
The purpose of the Olympics is to measure the highest level of athletic performance in a competition. Olympic athletes compete with a well-trained system of muscles, tendons and bones free of any chemical or hormonal enhancements. Oscar Pistorius's blades, however, are clearly a different kind of system. It is foolish to think we can measure and compare the performance of this type of mechanical system side by side with a biological system any more than we can compare men and women in the same event.
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August 20, 2012

The Mail

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The purpose of the Olympics is to measure the highest level of athletic performance in a competition. Olympic athletes compete with a well-trained system of muscles, tendons and bones free of any chemical or hormonal enhancements. Oscar Pistorius's blades, however, are clearly a different kind of system. It is foolish to think we can measure and compare the performance of this type of mechanical system side by side with a biological system any more than we can compare men and women in the same event.

Clyde Robinson, Framingham, Mass.

LETTERS

Prosthetic Debate

How can some in the world of track and field, which has a history of athletes doping, complain about Pistorius having an edge over everyone else (Unfair Disadvantage)? Even if he did have some type of mechanical advantage, it would be obvious, and as a spectator I could see it and make my own judgment.

David Lowry, Ottawa, Ont.

There's another factor to consider when comparing Pistorius with able-bodied athletes. How fair is it that throughout training and races, Pistorius runs no risk of suffering an injury from the knee down? No broken foot, ankle sprains or shin splints. These are all common injuries for the average runner.

Bert DeVeau, Elizabethtown, Ky.

Munich

I want to thank L. Jon Wertheim for his informative and insightful perspective on the challenges Israeli athletes face in international competition (Never Forgotten). Rather than worrying about offending Arab nations whose athletes refuse to compete against Israeli teams, the IOC should have done everything possible to properly pay tribute to the Israeli Olympians who were brutally murdered at the Munich Games.

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