SI Vault
 
SOLE FOOD
Gary Van Sickle
February 04, 2013
THE PROS SWING HARDER THAN YOU, YET MORE AND MORE OF THEM ARE SWITCHING TO TRENDY SPIKELESS SHOES, WHICH LET YOU BRING YOUR INNER RUNNER, EXECUTIVE OR BEACH BUM TO THE GOLF COURSE
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
February 04, 2013

Sole Food

THE PROS SWING HARDER THAN YOU, YET MORE AND MORE OF THEM ARE SWITCHING TO TRENDY SPIKELESS SHOES, WHICH LET YOU BRING YOUR INNER RUNNER, EXECUTIVE OR BEACH BUM TO THE GOLF COURSE

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2

Oakley's original Cipher was golf's lightest performance shoe and a breakout star in 2012 with its sandpaper-like traction. At 260 grams, Oakley's Cipher 2 ($150) is still the reigning lightweight champion, but now it's even better because it's waterproof.

The Puma mantra of "look better, feel better, play better" continues with Faas Lite ($100), a lightweight performance shoe that comes in exotic colors, so Puma poster guy Rickie Fowler can match his neon-powered outfits.

GoBe, a new Minnesota-based company, uses strategically placed five-point stars on the soles—called the Talon tread design—for its Prodigy ($159), a high-performance model that is extremely flexible and easy on the feet.

The Sensei ($99) by True Linkswear is so light and easy to slide on, it's the closest thing to playing golf in slippers. Yet the superior nubby traction is good enough for Ryan Moore on the PGA Tour. The distinctive red stripe on the side is a nice touch.

There's a retro vibe to the Adidas Adicross ($70), a nod to street shoes of old. The Adicross has leather uppers, 124 traction lugs of varying sizes on the sole, and versatility—the shoelaces come in two colors for those who live on the edge.

1 2