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Modest Proposal
April 01, 2013
The Astros can hand out playing time at the four corner positions and at DH to an assortment of failed prospects: Brett Wallace, Matt Dominguez and Fernando Martinez, to name three. But one guy has to be in the lineup every single day—Chris Carter, who was picked up from the A's in February. Carter's power is the single most impressive tool of any Astro. He slugged .514 with Oakland last year and has a .535 career mark in eight minor league seasons. Contact is a problem: He struck out in 38% of his at bats last year, and that will drag down his average. However, in a full season of aiming at the Crawford Boxes he could hit 40 homers and draw enough walks to produce a respectable OBP (think a younger Adam Dunn). The Astros may be hard to watch, but Carter, who has never played more than 67 big league games in a season, can thrill fans with some monster long balls. Houston traded starting shortstop Jed Lowrie to get Carter, so they've already made an investment in him. Now they have to nurture that investment with untrammeled playing time.
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April 01, 2013

Modest Proposal

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The Astros can hand out playing time at the four corner positions and at DH to an assortment of failed prospects: Brett Wallace, Matt Dominguez and Fernando Martinez, to name three. But one guy has to be in the lineup every single day—Chris Carter, who was picked up from the A's in February. Carter's power is the single most impressive tool of any Astro. He slugged .514 with Oakland last year and has a .535 career mark in eight minor league seasons. Contact is a problem: He struck out in 38% of his at bats last year, and that will drag down his average. However, in a full season of aiming at the Crawford Boxes he could hit 40 homers and draw enough walks to produce a respectable OBP (think a younger Adam Dunn). The Astros may be hard to watch, but Carter, who has never played more than 67 big league games in a season, can thrill fans with some monster long balls. Houston traded starting shortstop Jed Lowrie to get Carter, so they've already made an investment in him. Now they have to nurture that investment with untrammeled playing time.

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